What you should know about bad fats in your diet

Many a time, medical practitioners advise patients to avoid bad fats, but what exactly are bad fats? Yeah, I know you’ve been wondering too.

Fats are a class amongst the three most consumed food types which produce bulk energy to the body called macronutrients. The other classes are carbohydrates and proteins.

There are four types; saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and Trans-fats.

Saturated fats have a high melting point and tend to solidify at room temperature.

Sources include; animal fats like, cheese, butter, whole milk, and fatty meat. Pizza, ice-cream, sausages, and chicken skin are also high fats sources.

Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated (unsaturated) fats have a lower melting point and liquefy at room temperature. Its sources include; avocado, nuts, olive oil, corn oil, soybeans, and fish.

Trans-fats are a byproduct of unsaturated fats that are converted to solid fats during food processing and include fried foods, doughnuts, and cookies.

Saturated fats and trans-fats are considered the “bad fats “as they increase the “bad” LDL cholesterol in the body, which is associated with increased levels of clogged arteries, heart disease, and stroke.

Unsaturated fats are the “good fats.” They increase HDL cholesterol, which lowers the “bad” LDL cholesterol and reduces your risk for heart disease and stroke, they also help to build strong cell membranes in the body.

The nutrition expert, Ruth Kerubo, advises that it’s more important to eat more beneficial “good” fats and limit harmful “bad” fats intake, since both fats aid in the absorption of other micronutrients such as vitamin A, D, E and K in the body.

She limits the daily dietary fat intake to 70g of total fats,15g strictly being saturated fats.

So yes, avocado is “good” fat, let’s get that githeri going and avoid “bad fats’.

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